October tbr check in

Hello, friends, and happy middle of October! For today’s post I’m going to be doing a check in on how I’m doing with my tbr for the month. So, without further ado, let’s see how I’m doing!

🔘 = not read; ❌= DNF; ✅ = read

Book of the Month

  • The Invisible Life of Addie Larue 🔘 I haven’t read this yet but it is on my TBR for Dewey’s Readathon, which takes place this Saturday!
  • A Deadly Education ❌ I gave this one a try despite the controversy but it was not worth it. I can’t speak on the representation of the MC, but I did notice other things that were problematic in regards to witchcraft and use of practices from closed traditions, so I’m not surprised this book has other issues. And honestly, I was not a fan of the clear Harry/Draco vibes so this was a DNF for me.
  • Bringing Down the Duke 🔘 not read yet
  • Practical Magic 🔘
  • Mexican Gothic 🔘

October Releases

  • Beyond the Ruby Veil ❌ I tried this one but found the MC insufferable and her whole character kind of trite. The book seemed like it was trying too hard to be cool and dark and came off as comical instead.
  • Plain Bad Heroines ❌ I might try this at another time but I found the writing style very challenging.
  • The Once and Future Witches 🔘
  • This is All Your Fault ❌ this is my second attempt to read this author but I’m thinking her writing style is not for me. It’s very odd and feels stilted when I try to read it and something about it feels off to me. This particular book is also too similar in plot to another book I read recently, THE SUMMER OF EVERYTHING, which was much better.

From Previous Months

  • The Scapegracers 🔘
  • Surrender Your Sons 🔘
  • Girl, Serpent, Thorn ✅ Melissa Bashardoust became an autobuy author for me with this book. The sapphics are so lucky to have her.
  • Legendborn 🔘
  • You Should See Me In A Crown 🔘
  • Cemetery Boys 🔘
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romance recs for tech witches

I’ve been meaning to make this list forever since discovering I have a bit of a thing for romances set in the tech world, and an interest in tech witchcraft. I love reading about the weird work politics of tech companies and app creation and have managed to read and add a few to my TBR that are really great! So, today I’ll be telling you about how you can be a tech witch and add technology into your witchcraft practice, and feature 4 romances set in the tech industry.

**This post includes affiliate links for Bookshop.

what is a tech witch?

A tech witch is a more recent path of witchcraft that focuses on the use of computers and other technology to enhance their practice.

how to add technology to your craft

  • Keep a digital grimoire. A lot of people use their phone or computer to store their grimoire or book of shadows because it’s both convenient and discreet. I’ve seen many witches use their Tumblr as a way to hold onto spells and information. Personally, I’ve been trying to make my grimoire more organized with Notion.
  • Cast emoji spells. This can be done on any social media app just by typing out emojis that correspond with your intent or what you want to manifest. I first discovered emoji spells via witchblr (witchy Tumblr), where you can use likes to charge your emoji spell and reblogs to cast it. You can also send someone a little good fortune (or bad, I suppose) by doing this in a text.
  • Use apps for your practice. There are many witchy apps you can add to your phone, like astrology apps or moon phase trackers and widgets. There are also a ton of plant apps out there, and even some that identify crystals.
  • Use Pinterest for a digital altar. One of the great things about tech witchraft other than being discreet is that you can keep your cats from destroying it. I personally can’t keep a physical altar because I have destructive furbabies and a small living space, but I could keep a digital altar with images from pinterest or creating moodboards on Canva.
  • Add notifications for astrological/witchy happenings. If you’re like me and always forget when the sabbats, esbats, solstices, and equinoxes are, this may be a good option for you to keep track.

Book Recommendations

the right swipe

This book was one of the first romances I read, and it completely blew my expectations out of the water. I was expecting something light and fluffy about a one night stand turning into something more over a dating app rivalry, and got so much more. Rhiannon and Samson are equally interesting narrators, and I cared about their stories so very much. I thought the way the author handled Rhiannon’s previous harassment at her former company was so sensitive but empowering at the same time, and I felt really seen by the way Alisha Rai wrote that part of the book. This book definitely had MANY fun parts to it too, and Rhi and Samson’s chemistry just sang through the pages of the book.

the boyfriend project

I bought THE BOYFRIEND PROJECT as my May Book of the Month selection, and let me tell you, this book is an interesting ride. The pitch is pretty straightforward: Samiah swears off men in favor of pursuing her personal goals in creating an app after catching her boyfriend cheating on her with two other women. This book also surprised me, but in a very different way from THE RIGHT SWIPE. The author added a trope that I was completely not expecting and I found that I was super into it? I also have to say I love Samiah’s character and found her really inspiring but relatable to read about and enjoyed her journey.

how to hack a heartbreak

I haven’t finished HOW TO HACK A HEARTBREAK yet but what I’ve read so far is pure entertainment and super fun. I can’t get enough of books about ladies in tech taking things into their own hands and developing a whole app in the course of a book. The writing in this book is really fun and spunky, as is the voice of our main character Mel, who obviously has the best name.

love at first like

I was really excited when I realized the author of this book, Hannah Orenstein, wrote one of my most recent reads, HEAD OVER HEELS, because I liked the writing in that book quite a lot. This book is about a woman who co-owns a jewelry shop and posts a picture on her Instagram of her wearing an engagement ring to 100k+ followers after learning that her ex is engaged. So, she has to find a fake bf fast, and of course all the fake dating shenanigans that I can’t get enough of ensue.


There are, of course, many more books outside of romance that are tech-related, so if you’re interested in more of my recs, check out this list on my Bookshop affiliate page!

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why people think book bloggers shouldn’t get paid

Since book Twitter’s most recent discourse about the ethics of paid reviews, I’ve been thinking a lot about WHY people don’t think that book bloggers should get paid. This discussion has happened over and over again, as has the discussion about book bloggers being undervalued, and I think it’s important to look at why this is.

Lately, I’ve been thinking back to one of the other things about book bloggers that has been discussed many times around conferences and conventions: book bloggers and ARCs. Book bloggers have a terrible reputation at cons because we’re seen as ARC hoarders. However, on the flip side, people tell us that we should be grateful to get a free copy of a book as compensation.

People have debated many solutions to the “ARC stealing” book blogger problem, including starting some sort of “professional” organization to prove your worth as a blogger. This suggestion came about one year because a YA writer who I will not name said that “anyone can be a blogger.” This made me super angry at the time and I think after many years have passed since then I’ve finally figured out why (and I promise it’s related to why people don’t think bloggers should be paid!):

Book blogging can, in fact, be done by ANYONE. It’s not like booktube or bookstagram, where you honestly do need lots of expensive equipment, millions of books, or at least photo editing skills that come with an access to software to learn it or advanced computer knowledge that people get from having computer access. Blogging, in contrast, is the most ACCESSIBLE form of book promotion that exists. All you need is a computer and the ability to write content. There are many free, user-friendly platforms to use to blog, even if you’re new at it. You don’t HAVE to put pretty photos of your own books on a blog. Blogging is FOR EVERYONE, and there needs to be a platform that you don’t have to be wealthy to use.

And I think that is the crux of the issue when it comes to paying bloggers. Because blogging is so accessible, people think it means it’s just a hobby and not worthy of being monetized. Some people don’t even have blogging expenses, so it’s easy to subconsciously think that because of that, bloggers don’t NEED to be paid like booktubers or bookstagrammers who require large numbers of physical copies of books, equipment, and video or photo editing software subscriptions.

So really, the issue of why people think book bloggers shouldn’t get paid comes down to elitism. Because book blogging is accessible, it’s not seen as “serious” or “professional.” Obviously, those things are not true, because blogging also takes a lot of time and effort to put out good content. People see platforms like booktube as more of a “job,” while blogging is seen as something less serious and therefore less valuable, even though that is certainly not the case.

Unfortunately, I do not have a solution to pose on how to make people see the value of bloggers. We have all said again and again that we are the reason the book community exists, but it often feels like shouting into the void. I also don’t know if I see things improving, because the book community seems to be turning to these more visual platforms as their primary means of book promotion. Still, I hope that one day, people from across book community platforms will realize we all want the same thing: to share and talk about books, and maybe, someday, we’ll ALL promote both books and each other.

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why there’s no such thing as an unbiased review

Every now and then, the book community has discourse about the ethics of book bloggers being paid for reviews and the ethics of paid reviews. The fact that this argument is used to argue against book bloggers receiving payment while other parts of the book community (bookstagram and booktube) regularly receive payment to promote books is a whole separate issue, and today, I’m going to be telling you why there is no such thing as an unbiased review and why that aspect of the argument is ridiculous.

The thing is, BOOK REVIEWS ARE OPINIONS. It is not a report on a book, and any of the things reviewers say about the writing or characters or plot are OPINIONS. Opinions are inherently SUBJECTIVE, not objective. There would be no point in reading a book review that was just facts about the book, and honestly I don’t even know what that would look like–probably a synopsis and overview of characters?

People read reviews because they want to know if the reviewer liked or disliked the book. You can say in a review why you think other readers might like a book that you didn’t, but even that is still an opinion because reviewers are not mind readers for every single person who has read or might read a particular book.

Reviews also aren’t objective because you ALWAYS go into a book with some level of expectation. The only way you can go into a book with no expectations is if you don’t see the cover or synopsis. But honestly, even the title of a book can influence how you view what the book is going to be like or what you are going to think of it. Things like a cover and synopsis are SUPPOSED to make you have a pre-reading opinion of a book, because how else would you know you wanted to buy it? However, going into a book with expectations of any kind is already a “bias.”

Reviews are also not meant to be editorial critiques, which should be more on the unbiased side of things than a review. When you’re editing and looking for how to improve the book, you’re looking at how to enhance the work that’s already there, not necessarily adding or taking away things willy nilly that you personally like or don’t like. In an editorial critique, there needs to be more of a level of objectivity and it’s less about your personal likes and dislikes. However, editorial critiques are meant for writers, and reviews are for readers (as much as some authors like to ignore that fact), which means a personal opinion is important.

I think what this debate also comes down to is that people don’t want to see that REVIEWS ARE FOR READERS. The point of a review is not, at its heart, promotion. That is a side benefit that can come from a review, but I guarantee people are not posting one-star reviews on Amazon or Goodreads because they’re trying to get you to read it. The true purpose of a review is to help readers decide if they want to read a book. They are not an editorial critique for authors or promotion for authors: they are for readers.

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the only black girls in town // review

Title: The Only Black Girls in Town
Author: Brandy Colbert
Pages: 368
Date published: March 2020

Beach-loving surfer Alberta has been the only black girl in town for years. Alberta’s best friend, Laramie, is the closest thing she has to a sister, but there are some things even Laramie can’t understand. When the bed and breakfast across the street finds new owners, Alberta is ecstatic to learn the family is black-and they have a 12-year-old daughter just like her.

Alberta is positive she and the new girl, Edie, will be fast friends. But while Alberta loves being a California girl, Edie misses her native Brooklyn and finds it hard to adapt to small-town living.

When the girls discover a box of old journals in Edie’s attic, they team up to figure out exactly who’s behind them and why they got left behind. Soon they discover shocking and painful secrets of the past and learn that nothing is quite what it seems.

Wow, I really liked this book!! I went into it with very open expectations because I hadn’t read a book by Brandy Colbert yet, and also because I knew nothing about it when I started reading since I primarily picked it off my library’s new shelf because it was pretty and had a cool cover. Let me tell you, I ended up being blown away and becoming very interested in Brandy Colbert’s other books, so let’s get into why I loved this book so much.

The first thing that really sang to me in this book was the beach setting. Alberta, our main character, lives in a seaside town in California that has small town vibes. The first thing we get to learn about our lovely Alberta is that she loves to surf. I really enjoyed all the scenes throughout the book about her surf camp and her teacher, who was really supportive, and her friend Oliver, who also hated the mean girl on the team who says racist things to Alberta.

Now, I can’t comment on the rep fully because this is not an ownvoices review, but I can say this book dealt with racism in a much more nuanced way even than some YA books I’ve read. I liked how Brandy Colbert described how the comments her white peers made made Alberta feel, even with her friend Laramie, who still sometimes said stuff that made Alberta uncomfortable. It was interesting to have those comments and compare them to some of the seemingly more overt stuff that her mean neighbor, Nicolette, says.

I also thought the discussion on “skinfolk vs kinfolk” was interesting. When Alberta’s new neighbor, Edie, moves into the old B&B, one of her fathers says that just because a person is “skinfolk” (meaning they’re both Black) doesn’t mean they’re “kinfolk” (meaning they’ll actually like each other and get along). I’m not going to comment much more on that because I can’t tell you what that would mean for an ownvoices reader.

I also LOVED the mystery element. I was absolutely not expecting that part of the book when I went into it, and was surprised when Edie discovered the journals in her house. However, I was immediately hooked by the story being told in the journals, and how the girls immediately knew the writer was Black, even if they took some time to find out what the whole story was. The journals added so much to the story and were a really creative way to talk about important parts of Black history, which I won’t go into too much because I don’t want to spoil what they discover.

The friendships in the book were also wonderful to read about, as they often are in MG novels. I loved watching Alberta get to know Edie, who is very different from her. I found Edie so charming and funny and unique, and appreciated how Brandy Colbert really took a lot of care with Edie’s character to make her a multidimensional character with her own goals, thoughts, and feelings too. It was also interesting to see the interactions between Edie, Laramie (Alberta’s first best friend who she’s known most of her life), and Alberta and see how that affected her friendship with Laramie as well. I think the themes dealt with in each friendship are things lots of middle grade readers could relate to, and they were all handled so sensitively.

This book ended up completely surprising me, and I’m so glad that I picked it up on a whim. I am definitely going to be reading Brandy Colbert’s latest YA book, THE VOTING BOOTH, which has been on my TBR for quite a while. I also fully intend to read any future MG books she writes if this type of writing and story is what we have to look forward to!

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october tbr

book of the month

These are books from both past and current BOTM boxes that I need to read:

  • The Invisible Life of Addie Larue – V. E. Schwab
  • A Deadly Education – Naomi Novick
  • Bringing Down the Duke – Evie Dunmore
  • Practical Magic – Alice Hoffman
  • Mexican Gothic – Silvia Moreno-Garcia

october releases

  • Beyond the Ruby Veil – Mara Fitzgerald (Oct. 13)
  • Plain Bad Heroines – Emily M. Danforth (Oct. 20)
  • The Once and Future Witches – Alix E. Harrow (Oct. 13)
  • This is All Your Fault – Amina Mae Safi (Oct. 13)

from previous months

  • The Scapegracers – Hannah Abigail Clarke
  • Surrender Your Sons – Adam Sass
  • Girl, Serpent, Thorn – Melissa Bashardoust
  • Legendborn – Tracy Deonn
  • You Should See Me in a Crown – Leah Johsnon
  • Cemetery Boys – Aiden Thomas
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october goals & good readance wrap up

Hello friends, and welcome to the most glorious month, aka OCTOBER! October is a month I always get excited for because it means it’s definitely fall, my favorite season, and when I’m at peak witchiness. Hopefully, that will be good motivation to actually meet my goals this month. So, without further ado, let’s recap my September goals & Good Readance tasks:

good readance wrap up

Here was what I hoped to accomplish for Good Readance at the start of the event:

  • Cull my books owned shelf. !! I did this, but tbh I’m probably going to put a lot back. I like owning books.
  • Remove tags by year on GR. !! I did this.
  • Update my ratings. !! Did this.
  • Make a professional GR account. !! I did this but…I don’t know if I’m actually going to use it or keep it. I might want to keep a written record of books I read for work/professional development.
  • Delete my eARCs shelves on GR. !! Did this, but honestly, I think it was helpful to have even though I didn’t always update it.
  • Create a catalog/database of eARCs. X! Started doing this on Notion. I have done my eARCs for 2020.
  • Delete all eARCs from before 2019. ?? I can’t remember if I did this. I did a few books, but can’t remember why or from what year.
  • Delete titles I don’t remember the author, title, or plot. X! Kind of started doing this.

september goals

  • Read 4-5 September releases. !! YES I killed this goal.
  • Drink less Diet Coke. !X um…I had less than normal during the weeks I worked so…does that count?
  • Try to reconnect with witchcraft. !! I did try to do this, but I think I’m still feeling disconnected because my tarot readings are all over the place.
  • Celebrate Mabon. !! I did this! I cleansed my tarot deck and tried to start redoing my digital grimoire on Notion.

october goals

  • Make time to do one relaxing thing per day. I took a webinar on Covid-related stress and anxiety, and one thing that the presenters suggested was taking time out of every day to schedule in something that you know calms you. I plan to make a list of things that relax me and make some kind of tracker to make sure I stick to this goal.
  • Read more picture books and MG. I want to do this both for my current job and to further my future career in publishing. I have been reading a lot more of those genres this year, but during lockdown that project fell to the wayside so I need to pick it back up again.
  • Read 3-4 October releases. I’m going to be posting my October TBR, which will include books actually being released this month, so I hope to read 3-4+ of these books because I felt super proud of myself last month for actually reading new releases on time.
  • Read Mexican Gothic!!! Lol @ me for making reading this book its own goal. I keep meaning to read it AND I got it as an add-on book with Book of the Month last month, so I really need to read it.
  • Celebrate Samhain. AKA the best witch holiday. This Samhain, I’m hoping I’ll actually be off to celebrate, which means a WHOLE DAY of witchy things are ahead!!
  • Participate in Dewey’s 24-hr readathon! I tried to participate in the summer reverseathon but only got a couple hours in. To be honest, I prefer the normal readathons in October and April and am very pumped. They’re also doing pre-readathon challenges this year that I hope to participate in, so expect a TBR post for those and the readathon soon!
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september rewind \\ it lasted a minute

Wow, um…where did September go? Most months during the pandemic have gone by at a snail’s pace but for some reason August and September went by in a snap. Let’s take a look at what I did and read during September.

books read

1. Who I Was With Her – Nita Tyndall
2. Charming as a Verb – Ben Philippe
3. Horrid – Katrina Leno
4. Early Departures – Justin A. Reynolds
5. One to Watch – Kate Stayman-London
6. The Summer of Everything – Julian Winters
7. Head Over Heels – Hannah Orenstein

Honestly, I’m super impressed with my reading in September. Other than July, where I read 9 books, this is my best reading month in 2020 so far. I’m also impressed because unlike in July, my reads were all regular novels instead of graphic novels, which usually take me much longer to read than a graphic novel.

My favorite book was definitely Charming as a Verb, which featured a low-key con involving dogs, a feisty female love interest, and a wonderfully flawed but ultimately soft hero. I loved this book so much and am definitely going to be recommending it to everyone I know.

My least favorite book was probably Who I Was With Her by Nita Tyndall. This book would for sure appeal to some readers, but for me, the way the narrative about coming out was written just hit me the wrong way, especially after all the Becky Albertalli stuff. It just didn’t make sense to me that the MC’s secret girlfriend was pressuring her to come out so much when she had just figured out she was bi. I think the pressure to come out has to be handled really carefully in books, and this one just hit wrong.

book haul

Book of the Month books:
1. Mexican Gothic – Sylvia Moreno-Garcia
2. Bringing Down the Duke – Evie Dunmore
3. One to Watch – Kate Stayman-London

NetGalley:
4. With You All the Way – Cynthia Hand
5. The Key to You and Me – Jaye Robin Brown

Edelweiss:
6. House of Hollow – Krystal Sutherland
7. The Dark Tide – Alicia Jasinka
8. A Taste for Love – Jennifer Yu
9. The Wide Starlight – Nicole Lesperance

I hauled a lot of great books this month. The one I’m most excited for is Krystal Sutherland’s House of Hollow, a mystery about two odd girls who went missing as children and returned a few months later. I’m actually also pretty pumped for The Wide Starlight, which I hadn’t heard about before but was comped to THE HAZEL WOOD and THE ASTONISHING COLOR OF AFTER, so I’m expecting both magic and a lot of emotions.

life updates

Nothing really happened this month of note. We added a Saturday schedule at the library, threw around a possible reopening date, seem to have forgotten the possible reopening date, and patrons were…patrons. The most exciting thing that happened was that book Twitter discovered Notion, a digital planning/note-taking app, that I knew about and had been using for my digital grimoire but had no concept of how to use, and am now going to be using forever because its so efficient and pretty. I also hit 400 followers on Twitter, which I am very proud of.

blogging

Here are some of my favorite posts from this blog from the past month:

  • I recommended books to read with autumn colors
  • I discussed why I don’t feel represented by portrayals of fat characters
  • I gushed about why you should read CHARMING AS A VERB
  • I reviewed WHO I WAS WITH HER
  • I talked about reconnecting with witchcraft

Here are my favorite posts from around the blogosphere from September:

  • Cande wrote about why they use the term Latinx
  • Clo discussed how her formatting system has changed
  • Sumedha interviewed me for her series Blogletters and wrote about why she doesn’t like comment back culture
  • Veronika recommended books with yearning
  • Tasya hyped some of her anticipated 2021 releases
  • Liv made a mood board for the FURIA blog tour, effectively adding it to my TBR
  • Caro spotlighted three amazing books
  • Fadwa discussed how the #ownvoices label has lost its way
  • Sofia highlighted upcoming books by Latinx authors
  • Tracy wrote about how to have a healthier relationship with reading

How was your September? Tell me all about it!

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one to skip // one to watch review

Title: One to Watch
Author: Kate Stayman-London
Date Published: July 7, 2020
Pages: 432
CW: fat shaming (some challenged), cheating

Bea Schumacher is a devastatingly stylish plus-size fashion blogger who has amazing friends, a devoted family, legions of Insta followers–and a massively broken heart. Like the rest of America, Bea indulges in her weekly obsession: the hit reality show Main Squeeze. The fantasy dates! The kiss-off rejections! The surprising amount of guys named Chad! But Bea is sick and tired of the lack of body diversity on the show. Since when is being a size zero a prerequisite for getting engaged on television?

Just when Bea has sworn off dating altogether, she gets an intriguing call: Main Squeeze wants her to be its next star, surrounded by men vying for her affections. Bea agrees, on one condition–under no circumstances will she actually fall in love. She’s in this to supercharge her career, subvert harmful anti-fat beauty standards, inspire women across America, and get a free hot air balloon ride. That’s it.

But when the cameras start rolling, Bea realizes things are more complicated than she anticipated. She’s in a whirlwind of sumptuous couture, Internet culture wars, sexy suitors, and an opportunity (or two, or five) to find messy, real-life love in the midst of a made-for-TV fairy tale. In this joyful, razor-sharp debut, Bea has to decide whether it might just be worth trusting these men–and herself–for a chance to live happily ever after. 

I really wanted to like this book. It had all the makings of a Mel book, complete with body positivity and reality tv, which I am definitely a sucker for no matter how I try to watch other types of shows, and I was honestly really interested to see how this story played out.

I feel weird about rating this book because while it held my interest and I was entertained while reading, I also had MANY issues with it and it is objectively not a good book for a lot of reasons. I think my problems with this book stem from two issues, the formatting and the fact that it was almost TOO realistic.

I read this book expecting a fantasy. I thought the point of the book was to give a fat protagonist the fantasy romance that eludes fat people in real life reality shows and show a fat person being ridiculously happy and in love. Unfortunately, what I got was…not that. This book was too realistic to the point where everything was predictable because everything happened in the book the way it would in real life. This included extreme amounts of fatphobia, both in the scenes with Bea on the show and in the articles and online comments shown in the “between” sections. I was of course expecting some amounts of this, but there was so much that it was almost triggering for me and took away from what I think the story could have been.

I also grew annoyed with Bea’s responses to the fatphobia. She always had the “right” response and was able to deliver it despite probably being very upset by it, but it made her seem like a wall and not a real character. Her whole character was based around her supposed confidence, but outside of her confidence, I found her to be a relatively cold character. Her confident responses to people demeaning and belittling her on a show that was supposed to center around her happiness seemed manufactured and there just to prove a point to the reader.

I was also not a fan of the “romance” between Bea and Ray that kind of sets off her whole romantic journey. First of all, he’s engaged to be married, but has a relationship with her anyway, and at the time, Bea seems to see no problem with this because she thinks they’re meant to be together, which made me not like her that much at first. Pining after an engaged man and doing things she shouldn’t with an engaged man did not seem like a particularly attractive quality that should’ve been the first time we see her in a romantic relationship. The whole thing made me really uncomfortable and I feel like there weren’t consequences for Ray’s behavior.

Honestly, I didn’t feel like there was much actual “romance” in the book at all. Bea even goes into the show agreeing to it only if she can break up with the “winner” a few weeks after the show. I went into this book expecting romance, but Bea is so cold to the guys on the show for most of the book that it’s hard to root for her or for any of the romances in particular. I think the formatting of the book also made the romances suffer, because we saw the romances happen through the eyes of the viewer of the show she was on, so we didn’t get to hear a lot of her inner thoughts about the guys or feel much chemistry. Really, I didn’t feel she had chemistry with any of the men, and I wish she had gone into the show wanting romance instead of trying to kill it at every turn, because it made for a boring book with low stakes.

Obviously, I knew going into the book that it was centered around a reality show, but the way the book was written was too much like reading a script or long episode guide rather than a book. I kind of wonder if the author went into writing this book expecting it to be made into a show, because it had much more of a cinematic feel than literary feel. Writing the book this way made it harder to get to know the characters and made it almost exclusively plot driven. I also really didn’t need all the articles and online chatter about the show between episodes, because all of those things were written exactly how they would be in real life, which took away what I thought would be the fantasy element of the book and didn’t add to the story in any way.

To be honest, I simply did not need a whole book to prove that fat people deserve love too at the end of the day, which seemed to be the message of this book even though it didn’t even quite deliver on that. This book seemed to be written for skinny people who needed to have that proved to them in a realistic way (hence all the fat shaming and online vitriol), instead of a truly body positive, fantasy romance that I was expecting and hoping for as a fat reader. The fact that this was the message of the book did not sit right with me, because it didn’t feel to me that fat people were the audience for this book despite it being written by a fat person and featuring a fat character. I did not need this book to prove to me that I am human and deserving of love, and that made it a frustrating reading experience as well.

Basically, this book failed to deliver on characterization, romance, and its message. I would definitely warn fellow fat readers away from this book as the fat shaming is truly hard to read at times, and suffering through the author trying to prove that we’re worthy of love was challenging as well. I had high hopes for this book as a lover of reality tv, but unfortunately, this book just did not impress.

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blogger spotlight: fall time fun posts

Hello, and welcome to the first edition of Blogger Spotlight, a new feature here on Cotton Candy Book Witch. I came up with this feature because I wanted to give back to the community and support fellow book bloggers by highlighting the excellent content being put out.

The theme of this post is featuring blog posts themed around fall. This round up will include fall book recs, tags, and more!

Spooks and tea readathon

Lauren @ Northern Plunder announced the perfect fall-time readathon, which is a readathon dedicated to reading HORROR for the month of October. The prompts are as follows:

A book with autumnal vibes
A horror book that was recommended to you
A book with paranormal creatures
Reread a spooky old favourite
A book featuring witches
A LGBTQ+ horror book
A horror book by an author of colour
A horror book you love the cover of
A book featuring something you’re afraid of

the pumpkin spice latte book tag

I saw Caro @ Bookcheshire Cat do this tag themed around the best fall drink, pumpkin spice lattes. I love all things fall and am definitely planning to do this tag.

on seasonal reading

Kristin @ Kristin Kraves Books has a great discussion post on seasonal reading. She discusses what makes a “fall” book, what she reads in other seasons, and holiday reading. The post is part of the Let’s Talk Bookish feature created by  Rukky @ Eternity Books & Dani @ Literary Lion.

fall time tbrs

I loved reading all the fall tbrs this week, including these from Alison and Kristin. From their lists, I am super excited to read A DEADLY EDUCATION, MEXICAN GOTHIC, THE INVISIBLE LIFE OF ADDIE LARUE, and CEMETERY BOYS. I need to join a fall themed readathon STAT so I can read these amazing-sounding books!

announcing #hallowreadathon

Asha @ A book. a cat. and a cup of tea. announced the Hallowreadathon and three prompts. This readathon is for three days from October 31-November 1.

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