romance recs for tech witches

I’ve been meaning to make this list forever since discovering I have a bit of a thing for romances set in the tech world, and an interest in tech witchcraft. I love reading about the weird work politics of tech companies and app creation and have managed to read and add a few to my TBR that are really great! So, today I’ll be telling you about how you can be a tech witch and add technology into your witchcraft practice, and feature 4 romances set in the tech industry.

**This post includes affiliate links for Bookshop.

what is a tech witch?

A tech witch is a more recent path of witchcraft that focuses on the use of computers and other technology to enhance their practice.

how to add technology to your craft

  • Keep a digital grimoire. A lot of people use their phone or computer to store their grimoire or book of shadows because it’s both convenient and discreet. I’ve seen many witches use their Tumblr as a way to hold onto spells and information. Personally, I’ve been trying to make my grimoire more organized with Notion.
  • Cast emoji spells. This can be done on any social media app just by typing out emojis that correspond with your intent or what you want to manifest. I first discovered emoji spells via witchblr (witchy Tumblr), where you can use likes to charge your emoji spell and reblogs to cast it. You can also send someone a little good fortune (or bad, I suppose) by doing this in a text.
  • Use apps for your practice. There are many witchy apps you can add to your phone, like astrology apps or moon phase trackers and widgets. There are also a ton of plant apps out there, and even some that identify crystals.
  • Use Pinterest for a digital altar. One of the great things about tech witchraft other than being discreet is that you can keep your cats from destroying it. I personally can’t keep a physical altar because I have destructive furbabies and a small living space, but I could keep a digital altar with images from pinterest or creating moodboards on Canva.
  • Add notifications for astrological/witchy happenings. If you’re like me and always forget when the sabbats, esbats, solstices, and equinoxes are, this may be a good option for you to keep track.

Book Recommendations

the right swipe

This book was one of the first romances I read, and it completely blew my expectations out of the water. I was expecting something light and fluffy about a one night stand turning into something more over a dating app rivalry, and got so much more. Rhiannon and Samson are equally interesting narrators, and I cared about their stories so very much. I thought the way the author handled Rhiannon’s previous harassment at her former company was so sensitive but empowering at the same time, and I felt really seen by the way Alisha Rai wrote that part of the book. This book definitely had MANY fun parts to it too, and Rhi and Samson’s chemistry just sang through the pages of the book.

the boyfriend project

I bought THE BOYFRIEND PROJECT as my May Book of the Month selection, and let me tell you, this book is an interesting ride. The pitch is pretty straightforward: Samiah swears off men in favor of pursuing her personal goals in creating an app after catching her boyfriend cheating on her with two other women. This book also surprised me, but in a very different way from THE RIGHT SWIPE. The author added a trope that I was completely not expecting and I found that I was super into it? I also have to say I love Samiah’s character and found her really inspiring but relatable to read about and enjoyed her journey.

how to hack a heartbreak

I haven’t finished HOW TO HACK A HEARTBREAK yet but what I’ve read so far is pure entertainment and super fun. I can’t get enough of books about ladies in tech taking things into their own hands and developing a whole app in the course of a book. The writing in this book is really fun and spunky, as is the voice of our main character Mel, who obviously has the best name.

love at first like

I was really excited when I realized the author of this book, Hannah Orenstein, wrote one of my most recent reads, HEAD OVER HEELS, because I liked the writing in that book quite a lot. This book is about a woman who co-owns a jewelry shop and posts a picture on her Instagram of her wearing an engagement ring to 100k+ followers after learning that her ex is engaged. So, she has to find a fake bf fast, and of course all the fake dating shenanigans that I can’t get enough of ensue.


There are, of course, many more books outside of romance that are tech-related, so if you’re interested in more of my recs, check out this list on my Bookshop affiliate page!

now that i’ve found you: review

Title: Now That I’ve Found You
Author: Kristina Forest
Pages: 336
Date published: August 25, 2020

A YA novel about searching for answers, love, and your eccentric grandma in all the wrong places.

Following in the footsteps of her überfamous grandma, eighteen-year-old Evie Jones is poised to be Hollywood’s next big star. That is until a close friend’s betrayal leads to her being blacklisted . . .

Fortunately, Evie knows just the thing to save her floundering career: a public appearance with America’s most beloved actress—her grandma Gigi, aka the Evelyn Conaway. The only problem? Gigi is a recluse who’s been out of the limelight for almost twenty years. Days before Evie plans to present her grandma with an honorary award in front of Hollywood’s elite, Gigi does the unthinkable: she disappears.

With time running out and her comeback on the line, Evie reluctantly enlists the help of the last person to see Gigi before she vanished: Milo Williams, a cute musician Evie isn’t sure she can trust. As Evie and Milo conduct a wild manhunt across New York City, romance and adventure abound while Evie makes some surprising discoveries about her grandma—and herself. 

I was really excited when this book was announced because of how much I adored Kristina Forest’s debut, I WANNA BE WHERE YOU ARE. This book had a lot of elements I liked, and also featured a brief cameo of Chloe and Eli, the stars of the romance in IWBWYA.

What I liked most about this book was how nuanced Evie’s character was. While I loved Chloe in Forest’s debut, I felt like she was a more cut and dry character who was easy to understand and to love, she was not as interesting to me as Evie. Evie definitely falls under the category of “unlikeable” characters, who I always end up liking because they feel more realistic to me as a reader. Evie comes across as kind of selfish and self-centered for most of the book, but underneath it, there’s the constant feeling she has of wanting people’s approval, insecurity, and feeling abandoned by the people she loves. Kristina Forest gives the reader a lot to unpack when it comes to Evie’s character, and that made her more interesting to read about and even root for her at times despite some of her self-centeredness.

Though at times Evie’s character got on my nerves, I still rooted for her and looked forward to the major emotional glow up I figured was coming for her character arc. Unfortunately, that aspect of the story fell a bit flat for me because it came at almost the very end of the story and was rushed through. Evie definitely learns a lot as a person and begins to recognize her own flaws, but the development of that part of the story was not as strong as I wanted it to be and there could have been a few more pages devoted to that.

In general, I really felt that the story could have been 20-50 pages longer to round it out and provide a meaningful ending. The twist in Milo and Evie’s romance felt rushed through, and they make up within the last few pages of the book without much build up between the last time they see each other and the resolution to their relationship. It felt like pages were missing between those two events and the jump that happened between them was a bit jarring.

I also did not find the romance between Milo and Evie as swoonworthy and ship-able as Chloe and Eli. I didn’t feel the chemistry between them as much throughout the story, because Evie is suspicious of Milo’s motivations with her grandmother the majority of the time, so the romance ended up seeming somewhat forced. I liked Milo as a character and wanted to know more about him during the story, but the relationship with Evie felt manufactured and planned versus natural and real. I do love to see a romance between two artists, but this one unfortunately did not do it for me.

The focus of the story seemed to be more about Evie’s relationship with her grandmother, which also made the romance feel sort of unnecessary. I think there would still have been a lot to like about this story without the addition of the romance. I also think because Evie’s relationship with her grandmother was explored so deeply and her grandmother’s life was delved into much more, that made Evie and Milo’s relationship seem flatter and not as interesting. I definitely would’ve loved the mystery to take hold of the story completely and for friendship and family to be front and center as themes.

Before this review becomes a full fledged essay, I’ll conclude by saying it did not meet my expectations and overall it fell flat for me. It’s certainly not a bad book by any means, but compared to the author’s first book it simply wasn’t as good. However, this is definitely one I’ll be recommending to teens at the library because there are still many fun elements to it that I think a variety of readers would enjoy. There is a little something for everyone in this book, from mystery to romance to interesting characters. While it was not as good as I hoped, I’d still consider this one three stars and wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it to readers who want something a little different in their contemporary picks.